To many people, the word “psychic” connotes having the ability to see into the future, referring (inaccurately) to clairvoyance. However, clairvoyance is but one of the eight clair senses whose manifestation indicates being psychic. Each psychic (i.e., clair) sense derives from an ability to detect things in the nonphysical (aka spirit) realm.

Highly capable psychic mediums are people who, whether genetically predisposed to having refined clair senses or not, have invested extensive time and labor in cultivating their skills. However, even fledgling psychic abilities (i.e., clair senses) have the potential to be activated with a certain kind of psychoactive substance: entheogens. Which ones? And how so? Read on to find out!

Note: Head Magazine neither advocates nor condones attempts to experiment with entheogens without the concurrence and assistance of a qualified physician.

Entheogens

An “ACS Chemical Neuroscience” article on entheogenic compounds succinctly defines entheogens as “plant-derived compounds that alter human consciousness for religious or spiritual purposes.” Wouter Hanegraaff expounds on that simplification in the book “Entheogenic Esotericism” as follows:

“The substantive entheogen was coined in 1979 by a group of ethnobotanists and scholars of mythology who were concerned with finding a terminology that would acknowledge the ritual use of psychoactive plants reported from a variety of traditional religious contexts, while avoiding the questionable meanings and connotations of current terms, notably ‘hallucinogens’ and ‘psychedelics.’ As suggested by its roots in Greek etymology (ȅνθος), natural or artificial substances can be called entheogens (adjective: entheogenic) if they generate, or bring about, unusual states of consciousness in which those who use them are believed to be ‘filled,’ ‘possessed’ or ‘inspired’ by some kind of divine entity, presence or force. While the altered states in question are pharmacologically induced, such religious interpretations of them are obviously products of culture.”

According to bionity.com, which aggregates content on life science and pharma in the key markets of Europe, the United States and Asia, there are 12 entheogenic substances:

  • 5‐methoxy‐N,N‐dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT)
  • Bufotenine (5-OH-DMT)
  • Dimethyltryptamine (DMT)
  • Ergot alkaloids
  • Ibogaine
  • Kavalactones
  • Mescaline
  • Muscimol
  • Psilocybin
  • Salvinorin A
  • Scopolamine
  • Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) (cannabis)

All of those are provided freely by nature in a variety of flora (trees, grass, seeds, fungi, etc.) and fauna (e.g., toads). Head Magazine has published a large volume of research on many of these substances – apart from the obvious, THC, found in cannabis. It might intrigue you to review the Sources and Suggested Reading section to explore a fraction of our findings beyond what is presented in this article.

Head Magazine traces cannabis’s entheogenic role across the centuries in “A Brief History of the Spiritual Use of Cannabis.”

Psychic Abilities: The Clair Senses

Here’s a quick summary of each clair sense, presented in alphabetical order for easy reference. The contents are distilled from information provided by author Liz Roberta, who runs the ACCPH-accredited Spiritual Coaching Academy, and supplemented by “Spirits Beside Us” by Chris Lippincott.

Clairalience: the ability to suddenly smell something without any physical fragrance.

You briefly smell something associated with a loved one who has passed on, like a certain cigar someone would smoke or a perfume someone would wear.

Clairaudience: the ability to detect sounds without physical hearing.

You hear songs or phrases with meaning to someone other than you. You hear voices giving you guidance that later proves valuable. You hear knocking on objects or bells ringing when no one is present to make these sounds.

Claircognizance: the ability to suddenly know something without logic or facts.

You have nagging ideas or unrelenting thoughts, even when no evidence has been presented to lead you to those ideas or thoughts. You’re certain of something (e.g., an impending event) without having or needing proof.

Clairempathy: the ability to receive intuitive messages through your emotions.

You experience other people’s emotions, ailments or injuries when they are nowhere near you and you are not communicating with them. You feel emotions in advance. You know when something is wrong with a loved one whom you’re not in contact with at the time of knowing.

A psychic medium with clairempathy can sense when something happens to someone without having any contact with that person, no matter where that person is. Photo by Roman Odinstov/pexels.com

A psychic medium with clairempathy can sense when something happens to someone without having any contact with that person, no matter where that person is. Photo by Roman Odinstov/pexels.com

Clairgustance: the ability to suddenly taste something without any physical food or drink.

You taste something associated with a loved one who has passed on, such as something that person would often cook. You taste blood associated with an injured or deceased person.

Clairsentience: the ability to receive intuitive messages through your body.

You get a gut feeling or sense of dread when something just doesn’t feel right, but you can’t explain how. This is accompanied by a physical reaction in your body.

Clairtangency: the ability to receive intuitive messages by laying your hand on something.

You know an item’s history (previous owner, place of origin, manufacturer, etc.) or what took place in a certain location by touching the item or the ground.

Clairvoyance: the ability to see clearly in the mind’s eye without the aid of physical eyes.

You receive extrasensory impressions and symbols in the form of mental images as if watching a movie in your head, or as if seeing them in front of you. You have vivid dreams in which dead relatives visit you, or in which you have premonitions of events that subsequently happen.

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio/pexels.com

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio/pexels.com

Entheogen-Clair Sense Pairings

Applying the transitive law (if A = B and B = C, then A = C), one can reasonably conclude the following for each entheogen: If a given entheogen induces effects parallel to those of a given clair sense, and if a given clair sense is manifested through symptoms that parallel those induced by a given entheogen, then said entheogen has the potential to simulate said clair sense.

5-MeO-DMT. Aka the God molecule or the Toad, 5-MeO-DMT causes visual, auditory and time perception distortions; emotional experiences; and intense mystical‐type experiences and feelings of ego dissolution. Mystical experiences involve an authoritative sense of unity or connectedness, accompanied by an altered sense of time and space. Ego dissolution involves a sense of oneness with the universe or the experience of relaxed boundaries between the self and the world. Those effects have the potential to stimulate clairaudience, clairempathy and clairvoyance.

Toads are among the natural sources of 5-MeO-DMT, as you’ll discover in “An Introduction to Psychedelics.” Photo of a Colorado River Toad by I,Wildfeuer, CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Bufotenine. Sometimes spelled without the final “e” and aka 5-OH-DMT, bufotenine causes visual hallucinations consisting of a play of colors, lights and patterns, often when the eyes are shut; a greater perceptive prominence of the auditory sense; profound emotional and perceptual changes involving a sense of imminent death; and intense but fleeting localized pain. Those effects have the potential to stimulate clairaudience, clairempathy, clairsentience and clairvoyance.

Bufotenine is the primary active constituent of the beans of Anadenanthera colubrina and Anadenanthera peregrina trees.Photo of Anadenanthera colubrina tree by João Medeiros, CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Bufotenine is the primary active constituent of the beans of Anadenanthera colubrina and Anadenanthera peregrina trees. Photo of Anadenanthera colubrina tree by João Medeiros, CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons

DMT. Aka the spirit molecule, DMT is one of the few entheogens produced naturally in the human body, possibly to facilitate a dying person’s transition from life on earth. (Read about how DMT models the near-death experience here.) When vaporized and smoked or consumed orally in brews (e.g., ayahuasca), it causes particularly vivid and complex visual imagery; auditory distortions (e.g., voices); an altered sense of space, body and time; the sense of visiting another world; disassociation or an out-of-body experience; the ability to unlock hidden memories; and an increased sensitivity to bodily sensations (body aches, tingles, feelings of pain and pleasure, warmth, and fatigue). Those effects have the potential to stimulate clairaudience, claircognizance, clairempathy, clairsentience and clairvoyance.

Head Magazine tells you all you want to know about ayahuasca in Part 1 and Part 2 of a story on the Pachamama Sanctuary, an ayahuasca retreat center in New Hampshire. Photo by martinak/123rf.com

Ergot alkaloids. Naturally occurring ergot alkaloids are mycotoxins produced by a fungal contamination of cereal grains, such as rye and wheat. Orally ingesting ergot generates effects similar to, but less potent than, the effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD). (Given that ergot alkaloids are used to create LSD, that’s not surprising.) Hallucinations, mania and psychosis are the only regularly reported psychoactive effects, and these have the potential to stimulate clairaudience and clairvoyance.

Discover an amazing bit of trivia about ergot, found in the dark fungus on the rye grains shown above, in “How LSD’s Ancestor Links Dinosaurs to the Salem Witch Trials.” Photo by Dominique Jacquin, public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Ibogaine. The main active ingredient of the West African shrub tabernanthe iboga, ibogaine is used in Gabon to induce near-death experiences for spiritual and psychological purposes. The ibogaine effect was divided into three phases by Howard Lotsof in the mid-1990s: 1) waking dream (hallucinations, closed-eye visualizations, sensorial experiences and the retrieval of repressed memories); 2) deep introspection (advanced cognitive abilities); and 3) residual stimulation (24-to-72-hour period of lingering psychoactive experiences). From those descriptions, the effects produced have the potential to stimulate clairalience, clairaudience, claircognizance, clairempathy, clairsentience and clairvoyance.

Ibogaine, comparable to but more potent than DMT, derives from a shrub native to West Africa. Photo of Tabernanthe iboga shrub by Hiobson, CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Ibogaine, comparable to but more potent than DMT, derives from a shrub native to West Africa. Photo of Tabernanthe iboga shrub by Hiobson, CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Kavalactones. These compounds are found in the Oceanic plant kava kava (piper methysticum) and are usually consumed as a drink. Common effects include relaxed muscles, sleepiness and feelings of well-being and relaxation. These effects have the potential to stimulate clairempathy and clairsentience.

Appreciate the range of uses for kavalactones, found in the plant shown above, in “Kava Kava: Key to Conquering Phobias.” Photo of Kava Kava leaves by Forest & Kim Starr, CC BY 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Mescaline. The main active ingredient in certain cacti (notably, peyote), mescaline induces visual (open-eye and closed-eye) and auditory hallucinations, an altered perception of time, radically altered states of consciousness, a mixing of senses (seeing sound, hearing color), a deeply mystical experience, and distortion between 2D and 3D objects. These effects have the potential to stimulate clairalience, clairaudience, claircognizance, clairempathy, clairgustance, clairsentience and clairvoyance.

Photo of Peyote via Wikimedia Commons

Photo of Peyote via Wikimedia Commons

Muscimol. Found in the muscaria (aka fly agaric) mushroom, muscimol induces feelings of euphoria and tranquility, an altered sense of hearing and taste, disorientation in place and time, mystical experiences, ataxia (loss of muscle control), feelings of weightlessness, macropsia and/or micropsia (perceiving objects as either very large or very small), changes to sensory perception, and vivid dreams. These effects have the potential to stimulate clairalience, clairaudience, clairgustance, clairsentience and clairvoyance.

Photo of Amanita muscaria by Bernard Spragg. NZ from Christchurch, New Zealand, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

Photo of Amanita muscaria by Bernard Spragg. NZ from Christchurch, New Zealand, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

Psilocybin. Better known as the “magic mushroom” or simply “shroom,” the mushroom extract psilocybin can occasion mystical experiences having substantial and sustained personal meaning and spiritual significance, God-encounter experiences, hallucinations, ego dissolution, enhanced ability for introspection, derealization (the feeling that surroundings are not real), and alterations of thought and time sense. These effects have the potential to stimulate clairalience, clairaudience, claircognizance, clairgustance, clairsentience and clairvoyance.

Explore the history, anatomy and complete story of magic mushrooms in “The Secret History of San Isidro de Labrador – Psilocybe Cubensis.” Graphic of Psilocybe cubensis by John W. Allen

Salvinorin A. Extracted from a plant in the mint family, Salvinorin A. can lead to a disconnection from external reality, elaborate visions and auditory phenomena, intense feelings of depersonalization and derealization, drastic perceptual changes, mystical experiences, revisiting childhood memories, cartoon-like imagery, contact with entities, and a sense of a complete loss of contact with the body. These effects have the potential to stimulate clairalience, clairaudience, claircognizance and clairvoyance.

Photo of Salvia divinorum via Wikimedia Commons

Photo of Salvia divinorum via Wikimedia Commons

Scopolamine. This extract from the Solanaceae (Nightshade) family of plants is commonly absorbed through the skin with a transdermal patch to treat nausea. When used in larger doses, however, it induces hallucinations, amnesia (partial loss of visual recognition memory), disorientation and sedation. These effects have the potential to stimulate clairvoyance.

In moderate, controlled doses through a transdermal patch, scopolamine is a commonly used means of preventing motion sickness    

In moderate, controlled doses through a transdermal patch, scopolamine is a commonly used means of preventing motion sickness

THC (Cannabis). When not eaten raw, the cannabis plant delivers THC. (The legal limit in the United States for a cannabis-derived product is 0.3% THC, and the product is referred to as “hemp” instead of “marihuana” in legislation and regulations.) THC induces euphoria, heightened sensory perception (e.g., brighter colors, more vivid music), altered perception of time, disorientation, reduced inhibition, relaxation, sedation, hallucinations, and changes in perception of time and space. These effects have the potential to stimulate clairaudience and clairvoyance.

Read about one of the innovative ways to consume THC without smoking in “Raise Your Glass High: The Future of THC Beverages.” Photo by Justin Aikin on Unsplash 

Conclusion

It’s vital to weigh the pros and cons of the effects of any entheogen prior to experimenting with it, as some (notably DMT, ibogaine and scopolamine) can have grave consequences in large enough doses. However, if you’ve discussed this with your physician and obtained approval to proceed, and if you’re curious as to whether you have unlocked psychic abilities, the above analysis might be a useful roadmap for you. Who knows, you might be taking a life-altering first step toward becoming a psychic medium.

Kathleen Hearons is a writer, editor, linguist and voice over actor from Los Angeles. She specializes in creative writing and research-intensive analysis and reporting.  

 

 

 

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